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is that in scotland. , came back over to be a conscientious objector when united states was at war. and consulate had to push the boundary of what was acceptable in order to show he was being true to himself and true to his principle and fighting for principles. and then the youngest, arthur, was a lot less sure of what to do. struggled at princeton, kind of didn't do what he wanted to do, thought about opening a part of them thought about being a missionary. >> with three mighty oaks in front of you -- >> exactly. why do you think there's no place in princeton for a boy such as you? and he was not so sure the world was a good idea, he was also not ready to go to prison to protest. he was a lot more like most of us. >> and there must have been a mother. >> there was. she was pretty extraordinary. she had her own pretty extraordinary path. she had grown up daughter of missionaries, and then her father, then the first present of the all white colleges of reconstruction in the south here but then she got on to marry a minister and had a very conventional life in ohio, big brood of kids. involved in chur
years especially for evin who had been over in scotland, what influence he and norman fought as opposed to what ralf and arthur -- >> it was huge. i mean, world war i was just unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen, just the deaf even in the u.s., you know, the u.s. lost about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted for six months. they were losing 820 men a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan was over in scotland, and then also and london a little bit, and she saw what it was like to see men come home without limbs and things like that, and also what it was like to be in london when the bombs were falling, but every man response to violence and every culture responds in different ways, he was actually wounded on the western front and recuperated in these hospitals, but he remained proud of what he had done and father was the right thing until the end of the war she was disillusioned, so i think that and they were well aware of how devastating the violence was but i don't find predictably drove them when we or another. but th
into the claim off to scotland because -- [inaudible] >> we'll adjourn on that note. >> thank you very much, indeed. [applause] >> historian andrew roberts on booktv. and to find out more visit the author's web site, andrew-roberts.net. ♪ >> coming up next, booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week, author eric stakelbeck asserting the obama administration is concealing the true magnitude of terrorist attack on u.s. soil. he makes his case using interviews with covert operatives and people he says are terrorists with link to al-qaeda. he discusses his findings with former u.s. house representative and radio host fred grandy. >> after i read this book, i came across a few facts that i want to run by you because i think it sets up the discussion pretty well. according to some data i've just seen, there are over 1200 government organizations across the country involve inside intelligence -- involved in intelligence, counterterrorism and homeland security. we've got about 850,000 people with top security clearances, and the
into the plane off to scotland because -- that would have been tremendously helpful. [laughter] >> [inaudible] >> thank you very much indeed. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> historian andrew roberts on booktv. visit the author's website andrew-roberts.net. >> what are you reading this summer in book tvments to know. >> first book on my reading list this spring and summer was kleopatra, and what a great insight in recounting her life. it was a book recommended to me, and so i decided to pick it up and read it and then continued with the strong woman theme if you will with elizabeth the first, and that's on my ipad, i'm reading these both as e-books. going back doing these two, it got me on to the historical and older novel type approach and with my bible study group, i'm rereading pilgrim's progress which is delightful to get back into that. it's been awhile since i've reread it and because there's a movie coming up, i, with my family, we're rereading atlas which is very tel
. as opposed to, you know, white americans being from scotland or norway or -- >> guest: well, i think so, yes. i mean, it's a country. we belong to the, we belong to a nation. and so, um, and it's one that's still there functioning. you know, we haven't left it. and we can't leave it. i mean, it's who we are. >> host: this e-mail from ricardo from texas, how hard was it to get published for the first time? >> guest: well, i think i was very fortunate the first time because, um, i sent some poems to the greenfield review and joe bruschak. he, also, is a great writer and an editor. and he said, do you have any more? and i said, yes. so i sent my, more poems to him. and he made them into a book. and so that little book which doesn't exist, t out of print now -- it's out of print now but "calling myself home" was my first publication. and then i also was publishing in magazines. and it's almost as if there's a process. you usually start with small magazines, small presses and then, you know, just keep going until somebody recognizes your name. because they've seen it enough and then, you know, la
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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